Ex-Harry Potter star, Daniel Radcliffe, is set to take on the role of Beat poet Allen Ginsberg in upcoming thriller, Kill Your Darlings –  the first feature-length film to be directed by John Krokidas.

Kill You Darlings, which was also co-written by Krokidas, is expected to detail the formation of the Beat Generation in mid-1940s New York. The story is likely to include the events surrounding Lucien Carr’s 1944 murder of his stalker, David Kammerer. According to Ginsberg “Lou [Carr] was the glue” that brought the beats together, but ended up in prison for the murder shortly after his introductions.

Originally, it was The Social Network‘s Jesse Eisenberg who was said to be attached to the role of Ginsberg, with Chris Evans and Ben Whishaw as Kerouac and Carr, respectively. However, with Whishaw recently being confirmed for the role of Q in the latest Bond film, Skyfall, and Evans taking over from James Franco in serial-killer drama, The Iceman, it is thought that these castings are also likely to change.

In fact, it was Franco who we last saw take on the role of Ginsberg, in the 2010 biopic, Howl. Several Beat legends, including Kerouac and Ginsberg, also appeared in footage which was recently compiled for Alison Ellwood and Alex Gibney’s documentary film, Magic Trip.

All eyes will no doubt be on Radcliffe over the coming year or two, to see which direction the 22-year-old actor will go in, now that his Harry Potter days have finally come to an end. Filming for Kill Your Darlings is thought to begin after Radcliffe finishes his Broadway stint, where he is currently appearing in How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying.

Filming of Kill Your Darlings will begin at the end of January. In the meantime, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2 is out on DVD tomorrow, and you can catch Dan in The Woman in Black in UK cinemas February 2012.

We’ll keep you posted!

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