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LFF Roundup #1: Young Girls in Black, Heartbeats, Two Gates of Sleep, Womb

LFF Roundup #1: Young Girls in Black, Heartbeats, Two Gates of Sleep, Womb

Behind the throbbing crowds of the red carpet and prestigious Gala screenings that dominate the media coverage of the London Film Festival, there are also a host of premiers for other pictures. Some worthy of your attention, others not. Sometimes it can be easy to forget amidst the scale of such a large...

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LFF Review: Meek’s Cutoff

LFF Review: Meek’s Cutoff

Film Festival favourite Kelly Reichardt returns for the third time to the capital for the British premier of her contemplative Western, Meek’s Cutoff , starring Michelle Williams. Arriving with considerable hype from its premier at Venice last month, Meek’s Cutoff marks something of a departure for...

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Zombies of Mass Destruction- a Review

Zombies of Mass Destruction- a Review

In the small conservative island town of Port Gamble, Washington, a deadly Zombie virus spreads rapidly through the population. As well as the flesh-hungry undead, writes Jon Appleyard for TFR,  we find the town contains a deranged homophobic priest, a Republican mayor running for a new term as well as his...

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LFF Review: Never Let Me Go

LFF Review: Never Let Me Go

Britain's rising acting talent have clubbed together to open this year's London International Film Festival, writes Russell Webber starting his coverage of the festival for The Film Review, with a quietly affecting, but ultimately flawed, adaptation of the respected Kazuo Ishiguro romantic...

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London River- a review

London River- a review

The topic of the 7/7 bombings in London has barely been touched on by film makers, so it is interesting therefore that the latest offering has come from a Franco-Algerian director. Rachid Bouchareb, known for Days of Glory, has taken on this tricky topic in London River. As a European Muslim himself,...

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One hell of a quirky caper: The Brothers Bloom review

One hell of a quirky caper: The Brothers Bloom review

Nobody really believed that director Rian Johnson could return with a movie with anywhere near the cult status of his début. Brick, burst onto the Indie film scene and then went on the win the Special Jury Prize for Originality of Vision at the 2005 Sundance Film Festival. But them came The Brothers...

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Moon

Moon

Hailed as being the best sci-fi film since ‘Blade Runner’, ‘Moon’ is the lonely story of Sam Bell (Sam Rockwell) who is coming to the end of his three year contract on the dark side of the moon. Working for Lunar Industries mining Earth’s primary energy source alone with no-one but robot Gerty (voiced...

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